Safaricom Fibre To the Home Experiences,Please share

mpesa
safaricom

#442

i agree maybe thika road has too many Safcom fibre subscribers thus affecting internet speeds


#443

That really shouldn’t be happening in an ideal world. I am guessing that they oversubscribed.


#444

Is it really an issue of “over subscription”? I’m not sure. If we go by the the coverage map and assume that most people in those areas have subscribed to it, places like Kinoo should also be having such issues. Thika road is not well covered according to the map(Note: someone pointed out that the map is not very accurate).

If it is in deed due to over subscription, then i was right:


#445

so currently only safaricom is expanding and connecting new customers the other ISPs seem to have halted any expansions especially in the residential side.
http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/corporate/companies/Safaricom–Huawei-eye-homes-in-fibre-Internet-deal/4003102-4082668-riw815/index.html


#446

It does not work like that.

Imagine all customers in an area have bought 5Mb/s. In an ideal world, for 100 customers with 5Mb/s connections, Safaricom would need a 500Mb/s connection to their backbone to allow everyone to operate at max speed. However, they may only have a 50Mb/s connection (10:1) because statistically, not all customers will saturate their connection all the time.

That is how oversubscription works.

A few ISPs move customers in an extremely oversubscribed area to a new connection, most do not care.


#447

How is my argument wrong?


#448

wah! To think last time I lived there I used to pay 10K for a two bedroom flat.


#449

You are using a ‘map’ to estimate oversubscription.

It is possible to have two close estates in Lavington with different contention ratios. Not common but it is possible.

A high concentration of subscribers does not necessarily mean oversubscription.

That’s all.


#450

Yes you can use the no. users as a proxy, because that is all we have. It’s a very simplistic argument. We don’t have actual number of users and their usage habits, we don’t have the bandwidth allocated and we definitely don’t know whether Safaricom has “stopped caring” about the quality of service.


#451

No, you can’t. As I mentioned earlier, a high concentration of subscribers does not necessarily mean oversubscription.

What is contention ratio:

500 users on a 10:1 contention ratio might have a better experience compared to 100 users on a 20:1 contention ratio.

When your contention ratio is high - meaning a lot of people are connected to the same line as you - it can potentially drag down your speeds.

The map itself has not been updated for quite a while now.


#452

I’m assuming some things are the same for both Kinoo and Thika road users and so the only variable (variable in QOS equation) is the no.of users. For instance, you said companies usually don’t care about moving users to a new connection when it gets congested- exceeds the preferred contention ratio as you put it. So if they not caring about thika road users, they are also not caring about kinoo users. So since kinoo has many subscribers(again I’m using the map to estimate the users), then Kinoo users should be having the same issues as those facing Thika road users, if not worse.

I did mention that someone had pointed out that the map is not very accurate.

Again I’m assuming a lot of things to simplify my argument.


#453

Safaricom are just being Safaricom. As if we didn’t already know them. Once their network gained more users, they were bound to have down times. Does Safaricom use all fibre on its broadband or does it also lease on Telkom adsl line? I think this is probably the case with Thika road. They have a copper cable there - probably. Thus the more down turns compared to the likes of Kinoo which have a higher subscription rate per cabinet. With all the infrastructure Telkom have, they would have been given everyone a run for his money. There are many vintage phone booths where I live. That is enough copper line to connect the entire neighbourhood.


#454

So Safaricom finally brought their fiber at my apartment in Rongai.


I have to thank a Bank whom we share the same building, without them this box wouldn’t be downstairs coz i hear they are the ones who requested for the fibre. We saw the sub-contracted Safcom guys literally drill a hole under the tarmac to get the fibre across to the other side of the road where our building is.
Now here’s the sad part, I am still under Airtel’s Unlimited internet contract, meaning getting Saf fibre would be an added cost that im not sure am ready to incur :unamused:. Then there’s the Faiba 4G on the way, and the rumoured Telkom 4G bundles are to be launched once 4G4FREE is over.
Guess am just doomed to wait for that Airtel 4G that’s been in testing mode for like a year now, (like really?? Airtel have to get serious now),
as I use 4G4FREE while am on the go


#455

For two years now. I wonder what they are preparing.

After I was told it is a contract and I must buy myself out of the contract to seek the services of a different ISP, I decided not to enter into a contract with them because news about Faiba getting that 4G license was all over and Telcos were crying foul. Then I decided to wait until Airtel launches 4G. So far, stories have been soon from 2015 and don’t be surprised 2018 they will still be speaking about soon.


#456

Be happy. We are about to get spoilt. I’m also now connected to the Safaricom fibre(standalone house…had to pull some strings and meet some costs).


#457

I need your help getting this


#458

Was just wondering why doesn’t safaricom do away with the free installation and have the interested customers pay an installation fee, I guys in stand alone houses they own who would pay upto 30k to get connected, In flats tenants can join hsnds to get connected, I just don’t get their business model.


#459

The free installation is to get as many people on board as possible.


#460

Their model works for them. Especially for flats. But for standalone homes, they should consider asking people to pay for it.


#461

It was an expensive affair but let’s hope the new technology they are using from Huawei will enable them to roll out to standalone homes, faster.